Futuristic Gun

Shooting you back
shihlun:

John Cage:

Artists                            talk         a   lot                             about             freedom.                                                     So,                                                          recalling         the         expression                “free         as         a         bird,”                             Morton         Feldman     went         to         a         park         one         day                             and         spent         some         time                              watching         our         feathered         friends.                                 When          he   came          back,                          he          said,                                               “You    know?                                  They’re          not        free:                           they’re          fighting        over          bits          of           food.”

shihlun:

John Cage:

Artists                            talk         a
  lot                             about
            freedom.

                                                    So,
                                                       
recalling         the         expression
               “free         as         a         bird,”
                            Morton         Feldman
    went         to         a         park         one
        day                             and         spent
        some         time                             
watching         our         feathered         friends.


                                When          he
  came          back,
                         he          said,
                                              “You
   know?
                                 They’re          not
       free:
                          they’re          fighting
       over          bits          of           food.”

"Humor is not a mood but a way of looking at the world. So if it is correct to say that humor was stamped out in Nazi Germany, that does not mean that people were not in good spirits, or anything of that sort, but something much deeper and more important."

— Ludwig Wittgenstein (via stickyembraces)


"We think this is reality. But in philosophy, that’s called naive realism:  "What I perceive is reality." And philosophers have refuted naive realism every century for the last 2,500 years, starting with Buddha and Plato, and yet most people still act on the basis of naive realism. 
Now the argument is, “Well, maybe my perceptions are inaccurate, but somewhere there is accuracy, scientists have it with their instruments. That’s how we can find out what’s really real.” But relativity, quantum mechanics, have demonstrated clearly that what you find out with instruments is true relative only to the instrument you’re using, and where that instrument is located in space-time. So there is no vantage point from which real reality can be seen. 
We’re all looking from the point of view of our own reality tunnels. And when we begin to realize that we’re all looking from the point of view of our own reality tunnels, we find that it is much easier to understand where other people are coming from. 
All the ones who don’t have the same reality tunnel as us do not seem ignorant, or deliberately perverse, or lying, or hypnotized by some mad ideology, they just have a different reality tunnel.  And every reality tunnel might tell us something interesting about our world if we’re willing to listen. 
The idea every perception is a gamble, seems to me so obviously true that I continually am astonished that I could forget it so many times during the course of 24 hours. But to the extent that I remember it, I just can’t stay angry at anybody, so it’s a thing worth keeping in mind.” 
http://www.dailygrail.com/Humanity-Plus/2013/7/Robert-Anton-Wilson-Explains-Quantum-Physics

"We think this is reality. But in philosophy, that’s called naive realism:  "What I perceive is reality." And philosophers have refuted naive realism every century for the last 2,500 years, starting with Buddha and Plato, and yet most people still act on the basis of naive realism.

Now the argument is, “Well, maybe my perceptions are inaccurate, but somewhere there is accuracy, scientists have it with their instruments. That’s how we can find out what’s really real.” But relativity, quantum mechanics, have demonstrated clearly that what you find out with instruments is true relative only to the instrument you’re using, and where that instrument is located in space-time. So there is no vantage point from which real reality can be seen.

We’re all looking from the point of view of our own reality tunnels. And when we begin to realize that we’re all looking from the point of view of our own reality tunnels, we find that it is much easier to understand where other people are coming from.

All the ones who don’t have the same reality tunnel as us do not seem ignorant, or deliberately perverse, or lying, or hypnotized by some mad ideology, they just have a different reality tunnel.  And every reality tunnel might tell us something interesting about our world if we’re willing to listen.

The idea every perception is a gamble, seems to me so obviously true that I continually am astonished that I could forget it so many times during the course of 24 hours. But to the extent that I remember it, I just can’t stay angry at anybody, so it’s a thing worth keeping in mind.”

http://www.dailygrail.com/Humanity-Plus/2013/7/Robert-Anton-Wilson-Explains-Quantum-Physics

(Source: atinteardrop)

"We may take it that the world is undoubtedly itself (i.e., is indistinct from itself), but, in any attempt to see itself, as an object, it must, equally undoubtedly act so as to make itself distinct from and therefore false to itself. In this condition, it will always partially elude itself.” And so with each one of us, “In this sense, in respect to its own information, the universe must expand to escape the telescopes through which we, who are it, are trying to capture it, which is us."

— John C. Lilly - The Center of the Cyclone: An Autobiography of Inner Space, 1972

Curtis Mayfield – Wild and Free (0 plays)
Scott Walker – The World's Strongest Man (0 plays)

"Therefore, if I feel bad or euphoric, about me, I am falsely attributing omnipotence to a part of the system as if it knew the whole, which it cannot. Negative brain systems are only part of the system I live in, as are the positive ones. Negative system stimulation constricts me through aversion; positive system stimulation constricts me through attachment."

— John C. Lilly - The Center of the Cyclone: An Autobiography of Inner Space, 1972

Tisziji Munoz - The Bhagavad Guitar Player

"In this respect we can tell those who assert the truth and certainty of the reality of sense-objects that they should go back to the most elementary schools of wisdom, viz. the ancient Eleusinian Mysteries of Ceres and Bacchus, and that they have still to learn the secret meaning of the eating of bread and the drinking of wine. For he who is initiated into these mysteries not only comes to doubt the being of sensuous things, but to despair of it; in part he brings about the nothingness of such things himself in his dealings with them, and in part he sees them reduce themselves to nothingness. Even the animals are not shut out from this wisdom but, on the contrary, show themselves to be most profoundly initiated into it; for they do not just stand idly in front of sensuous things as if these possessed intrinsic being, but, despairing of their reality, and completely assured of their nothingness, they fall to without ceremony and eat them up. And all Nature, like the animals, celebrates these open Mysteries which teach the truth about sensuous things."

— G.W.F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit (via belacqui)

Pharoah Sanders – Japan (2 plays)

(Source: 1109-83)